The Screaming Pen

Providing Global Insight, Context, and Perspective

And I Didn’t Even Mention Sharon

Israel Gains while an Incumbent Hamas Calculates its Direction

President Bush’s conference today in Washington with Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert was noticeable for more than just Bushisms like “suicider,” despite the bland analysis given initially by Wolf Blitzer et al. The chummy repoire between the leaders illustrated once again that Israel has the ear of the United States like almost no other nation. PM Olmert stated that the country would quit “most of the [West Bank] settlements” while annexing major “population centers,” a perhaps geographically logical maneuver but one that conflicts with the international Road Map to peace and is sure to upset Palestinians. Announced at the White House, the move clearly had the administration’s approval. Even more promisingly for Israel, Mr. Bush spoke passionately about the two nations’ shared views and goals, from Palestine to Iraq to Iran.

Mr. Bush put his feelings on display by venting frustration at Hamas’ lack of recognition for Israel’s right to exist. Indeed, Hamas has to recognize Israel along with renouncing the use of terrorism as a legitimate method of diplomacy. Without these steps – already agreed to by previous Palestinian leaders – the peace process cannot proceed. As Hamas has refused to do so thus far, Israel and America have been spearheading efforts to cut funding to the Palestinian Authority (PA), which helps pay salaries, secure fuel, and fund hospitals in the territories. The idea is that Hamas will be forced to capitulate. The reality, however, is much more nuanced.

That is because the Palestinian people voted Hamas into power in January. So despite the legitimacy of qualms about Hamas’ hostile rhetoric, America looks hypocritical: calling for democracy in the region but resisting it in practice when unfriendly parties are elected. Moreover, turning off aid is already showing signs of strangling the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Further starving and depriving the Palestinian people cannot be the result here.


Where to now?

What it Wants to Do

Hamas may put its mettle on display through vitriolic resistance to Israel, taking a martyr’s stand and feeding off of frustration. In this scenario, hardliners would find it easy to exploit the standoff, and the peace process would stall as Israel further solidifies the borders of a final state. Sporadic suicide bombings, Israeli air strikes, and inflammation of opinion throughout the region would continue. Palestine and peace would be the losers.

Resistance to Israel and death to America may make popular campaign slogans, but fanaticism is hardly a policy used to build a strong society be it in Palestine or anywhere else. So while martyrdom may allow Hamas to maintain support for a time, endless penury will cause Palestinians to rethink their allegiance to an unyielding cause. Just as voters cast aside the late Yasser Arafat’s faction Fatah for failing to provide adequate public services, they would do the same to an ineffective, exposed, and incumbent Hamas. Systems defined by opposition – but lacking in constitution – everywhere crumble for the same reason: because they fail to deliver sustainable development and the people living under them tire of stale ideologies. How long this takes depends on the propaganda and guns of the regime, but in the meantime lives suffer.

And What it Should Do

There is chance for a rosier outcome, however, if Hamas reads the runes shrewdly. When Hamas won power it grabbed 76 out of 132 seats in parliament with the support of a majority of electorate. Most Palestinians don’t cling to unrealistic visions of Israel’s total destruction or desire the rejection of the peace process, and it wasn’t for such views that they backed Hamas. Instead, it was a desire for change and a backlash against the corruption and mismanagement of Fatah – without Arafat – that led them to Hamas, which was offering security and basic services, particularly in the Gaza Strip.

Could Hamas begin to court this mainstream segment of its supporters? Hamas may find the realities of power more trying than obstreperously playing the spoiler from the sidelines. Accordingly, it could try to score points through fostering infrastructure and becoming more conciliatory toward Israel. It should reject extremists and move towards normalization. Crazy? Unlikely maybe, but it took Nixon to go to China and Sharon to withdraw from Gaza. Some think it possible because Hamas counts several American-educated operators among its number.

Lantos Lay Off my Jam Toast

Closer to home, Tom Lantos (D-CA) is of indubitable moral character, founding the Congressional Human Rights Caucus and expounding about rights transgressions around the world for decades. He made headlines for getting arrested outside the White House at the Darfur protest rally in April. But the bill he co-sponsored today – which passed 361 to 37 and imposes sweeping sanctions on the PA in response to Hamas’ victory – was pointless, and even the White House said so. As the administration ended funding last month, it was an unnecessary act that accomplishes nothing while portraying the United States as insensitive to the Palestinian people.

How much outsiders can influence the direction Hamas takes is uncertain. But if blocking funds contributes to humanitarian problems within Palestine it will not only enervate the people but arguments for America’s integrity. Despite misgivings about its past, the Quartet must preclude a humanitarian crisis and offer significant carrots to Hamas for recognition of Israel and renunciation of violence. However unsavory, the platform was elected and must be tolerated. If Hamas insists on belligerence, failure and stagnation are guaranteed; yet until the people’s candidates are allowed to govern they will fight to the death for the opportunity to find that out for themselves.

– DML

 2006. All rights reserved.

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May 24, 2006 - Posted by | Author: DML, Congress, Hamas, International Relations, Israel, Middle East, Palestine, Politics, United States

1 Comment »

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    Comment by Israel Trip | June 2, 2013 | Reply


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