The Screaming Pen

Providing Global Insight, Context, and Perspective

Chicken the China, the Chinese Chicken

A Changing Tide, the Spigot is Tightened

Since hitting an all time high on May 8, the MSCI Emerging Markets Index has fallen over 20%, as inflation fears and global monetary tightening begin to mop up the loose liquidity that has helped emerging market exchanges, along with other riskier assets, achieve strong annualized gains over the past few years.

With China experiencing staggering economic growth, one would think that the Chinese Stock Markets would have been on the winning end of a several year long emerging markets run. In fact, on June 6, 2005, while many Asian markets were continuously breaking multi-year highs, the Shenzen Compositie hit a six year low, puzzling amateur investors across the globe. Possible answers to China’s equity market conundrum can be found by taking a closer look.

The Times, they are a Shenzen

The Late Bird Gets the Sub Par Market Returns

China, a late bloomer in the Capital Markets game, did not have a stock market until 1990, and not a single Chinese company was listed abroad until 1993. As of 2003 -the latest information thescreamingpen.com could muster- over 66 million Chinese citizens participate in the domestic equity markets, with only 35 companies listed as private. It is estimated that at least two thirds of the shares listed on the Shanghai and the Shenzen, China’s two largest stock markets, are owned by the government. It is apparent that investors, especially those abroad, are hesitant to invest in companies whose balance sheets, among other things, could be compromised because of government involvement.

The Reforms of 2005

Realizing that capital inflows are essential to sustainable growth, the powers that be in China undertook some important reforms in 2005, including:

  • Public listing of the “Big Four” Chinese banks on overseas exchanges
  • Selling large stakes of domestic banks to international investors, which will result in increased capital inflows and much needed international banking expertise.
  • Reform of China’s A share market, which has resulted in 1/3 of China’s A shares being tradable.
  • The removal of capital gains taxes on securities held by foreign investors
  • The issuance of sovereign “Panda Bonds”, issued in Chinese currency.

Outlook and Conclusions

With the initiation of a global tightening cycle, it is possible that China may have missed out on the latest emerging markets rally. The good news is that China’s Eleventh Five Year Plan, which began on January 1, 2006, contains many provisions that aim to reform China’s financial sector even further. Hopefully these provisions are enacted.  This would allow China to efficiently handle foreign inflows of Capital, as well as wealth created at home.  If China continues down the road of financial sector reform, it will be a much needed step on the path to possible market maturity.

*Look for an overview of the Indian Financial sector reform in the coming days.

-JPL

Links of Interest

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/08/AR2006060801493.html

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June 9, 2006 - Posted by | Asia, Author: JPL, China, Chinese Stocks, Corruption, Emerging Markets, Globalisation, Investing, Politics, World Markets

1 Comment »

  1. A very accurate and well-written analysis of the Chinese stock markets. Another factor behind the listings’ weakness is the enormous amount of bad loans that were doled out in the 90’s, which China has yet to recover from. Opaqueness in banks’ lending process allowed government officials to secure exorbitant loans for projects that may or may not have been commerically viable (witness block after concrete block of empty high-rise apartment buildings in Shanghai). Most of these loans will never be repaid, and the size of the problem means that Beijing will be left holding the bill. Indeed, recent efforts to keep the Chinese economy from “overheating” – keeping annual GDP growth to around 7% – centered on stemming these loans, especially in sectors such as construction. Unfortunately for the central planners’ ambitions, local officials are increasingly defying government directives in order to line their pockets. As a result, Chinese efforts to cool the economy have so far been unsuccessful.

    Comment by Anonymous | June 10, 2006 | Reply


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