The Screaming Pen

Providing Global Insight, Context, and Perspective

Tom the Truculent’s Time to Retire

Sleaze and the Slander of American Democracy

The unfortunate product of a sleazy triangle between government, special interests, and unscrupulous lobbyists, widespread corruption is neither new nor surprising. Yet media outlets are far more likely to cover eye-catching events such as the gruesome abduction of pretty young girls or a judge reducing a pedophile’s prison term. The web of shady relations is byzantine, and the public largely prefers easily defined events like former President Clinton’s lurid sexual escapades. Complex corruption simply isn’t a very good news story. As a result, public debate has been quite dispassionate considering the magnitude of the problem.

This is true even in the face of the disgraced and truculent Tom Delay, former House Majority Leader; the arrest of the depraved lobbyist Jack Abramoff; subsequent allegations against Illinois Congressman Bob Ney, which outrageously also involve the “gang-land style” murder of a Florida businessman; the potential indictment of Bush confidant Karl Rove, hugely influential GOP strategist; VP Cheney’s former Chief of Staff Scooter Libby’s indictment, and more. The litany is so comprehensive it’s almost unbelievable.

Yet politically, and despite the fact that these scandals and a myriad of other blights are explicitly associated with the GOP, the Democrats have thus far been impotently unable to turn it to any advantage. This is bad not just for supporters of the Democratic Party, but for the whole country. When the extended lack of effective opposition allows any party unfettered control of all three levers of government, intolerance, arrogance, and corruption are inevitable results. In a democracy, elections are the remedy: when voters become fed up with their leaders they can remove them.


No thank you, Massachusetts: beans and lager make better exports

The Legacy of Elbridge Gerry

In the United States, however, among several disturbing trends there is at least one deeply troubling circumstance that threatens to undermine the efficacy of the electoral method. Redistricting – a euphemism for its more harmful cousin, gerrymandering – is a stratagem used to institutionalize political dominance at the expense of competition. From the Economist:

“Imagine a state with five congressional seats and only 25 voters in each. That makes 125 voters. Sixty-five are Republicans, 60 are Democrats. You might think a fair election in such a state would produce, say, three Republican representatives and two Democrats.

Now imagine you can draw the district boundaries any way you like. The only condition is that you must keep 25 voters in each one. If you were a Republican, you could carve up the state so there were 13 Republicans and 12 Democrats per district. Your party would win every seat narrowly. Republicans, five-nil.

Now imagine you were a Democrat. If you put 15 Republicans in one district, you could then divide the rest of the state so that each district had 13 Democrats and 12 Republicans. Democrats, four-one. Same state, same number of districts, same party affiliation: completely different results. All you need is the power to draw district lines. And that is what America provides: a process, called redistricting, which, through back-room negotiations too boring for most voters to think about, can distort the democratic system itself.”

This is a real problem in America, from Texas to California and everywhere else. The Economist – no petty partisan critic – calls the process “how to rig an election” and a “travesty of democracy.” They are right: in this year’s Congressional elections approximately 30 of 435 House seats will see competitive races.

Less Tinkering, More Oversight, and a Novel Idea

Republicans should be wary of resorting to disdainful methods, which also include eliminating the Senate filibuster – a vital tool of the minority since 1789 – and the near total exclusion of Democrats from seats of consequence on important committees. These will undermine democracy and will return to haunt them should they lose control of the legislature either in this year’s elections or afterward. Moreover, independent committees should handle legitimate redistricting needs, instead of allowing state legislatures to police themselves. Closer monitoring and regulation of lobbyists and a reduction of pork barrel spending are also needed.

Due to refusal to examine these issues, flouting of democratic methods, extreme profligacy (which has enraged small-government conservatives), and seemingly never-ending corruption, the GOP should be dealt a defeat in November. Indeed, some inauspicious signs are materializing for the GOP’s fortunes. Yet the Democrats likewise have work to do in that they must prove themselves capable of addressing the nation’s challenges. Unless they come up with a galvanizing idea about an issue of importance to the American people these will not translate to an electoral sweep. Without these, headlines will be captured by extremist proposals with little chance of passing or of accomplishing anything besides aimless legislative drift until 2008.

– DML

 2006. All rights reserved.

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May 20, 2006 Posted by | 2006 Elections, Author: DML, Congress, Corruption, Democrats, Politics, The GOP, United States | Leave a comment